Ministers of the Word

Ministers of the Word are those who are commonly referred to as readers but they are much more than that.You read a newspaper or a novel, you might read to your children. But with Ministers of the Word it is different. They are proclaiming the Word of God. This is God speaking to all of us….. This is what I believe The following is a copy of a document from The Liturgical Commission Of The Catholic Church

MINISTERS OF THE WORD

The grass withers, the flower fades, but the word of our God will stand forever. (Isaiah 40: 8) Your word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path. (Psalm 119: 105) The Word of God endures, creates, gives life. The importance of scripture in liturgy was perhaps lost to some extent in the Catholic Church until the reforms of the second Vatican Council reminded us of its central place.“The Church has always venerated the Divine Scriptures just as she venerates the Body of the Lord.” (Dei Verbum 21)“Christ is present in his Word since it is he himself who speaks when the holy Scriptures are read in the Church.” (Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy 7)The Introduction to the Lectionary for Mass spells out the link between scripture, faith and worship.“The preaching of the word is necessary for the sacramental ministry. For the sacraments are sacraments of faith and faith has its origin and sustenance in the word. The Church is nourished spiritually at the table of God’s word and at the table of the eucharist.” (LMI 10)

The only contact that many Catholics have with the living word of scripture occurs at Sunday Mass. It is vital that this encounter be a positive experience so that they will develop over time a “warm and living love of scripture”.

Those who are called to be readers at Mass, then, take on an important ministry. In fact they are not ‘readers’ at all. Almost everyone can read, but only some can effectively proclaim the word of God. Those people who serve the liturgical gathering by proclaiming the scriptures are best described as ‘Ministers of the Word’.

What is needed to someone to carry out this role effectively? The basic requirement is faith in the word of God. A reader must be someone with a love of scripture who believes that it is alive and active and gives guidance.

Readers must understand what they are reading in order to clearly convey the meaning of a passage to others. Such understanding is achieved by careful preparation, starting well before the person is scheduled to read. This involves reading the scripture passages through several times, slowly coming to grips with what the words are saying. Readers should also have access to a readers’ workbook or scripture commentary to assist them. Practising reading the passages aloud is another important aspect of the preparation process.

Finally, ministers of the word need to have the skills required for reading aloud in public, including a strong voice which can be projected clearly and the ability to use speech techniques such as pace, pause and pitch to give vitality and variety to their reading.

I am often asked by parishes to recommend resources for training their ministers of the word. It seems that not everyone has discovered the addition that was made to Break Open the Word, the preparation book for readers published by The Liturgical Commission in Brisbane, several years ago. In the back of the book are a number of Readers’ Formation pages covering topics such as the arrangement of the lectionary, reading skills and a model for preparation. This material may be used with groups of readers in a parish setting or by readers individually who wish to improve their understanding and skill.

The Word of God is proclaimed rather than just read, which involves the Minister reading the text in prayer and reflection beforehand, so that the Word is actively heard, rather than passively listened to by the Assembly. Training and resources are provided and a current Blue Card is required. New Ministers are welcome. Please contact the parish office to register your interest in this Ministry.

Office Hours: Mon, Tues, Wed, Thur, Friday - 9:00 am to 1:00 pm
Email: coomera@bne.catholic.net.aumail-icon-128
Phone: 07 55299144 call icon

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Weekly Readings

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Weekly Reflection

Dear parishioners, visitors & friends,

The book of Ecclesiasticus confronts us today with the message, “If you wish, you can keep the commandments, to behave faithfully is within your power.” How does this message speak to us? Do we really have the power to behave faithfully to the commandments of the Lord? The question seems quite simple yet is very difficult at the same time. Each and every one of us have our own burdens to bear and very often we seem to perceive, in the midst of these burdens, that “behaving faithfully” to the commandments of the Lord is way beyond our reach. Sometimes it is just too hard to follow the Lord and sometimes it is just too hard to let go of certain habits that we have fallen into. Some habits may give us a lot of happiness and fulfilment but sometimes we can really wonder whether or not these habits, that have become second nature, are really good for us? This becomes a moral dilemma for us all as we find ourselves divided between what God wants and what we want. Sin in a broad sense is the very action that we commit against God’s Word and then we cannot reflect holiness. God never permitted anyone to sin since creation. “He never commanded anyone to be godless; he has given no one permission to sin” (Eccl. 15: 15-20). But if God never permitted anyone to sin, why do we constantly commit such sins anyway? Psalm 118 gives an entire account of what it means to be a human person who wants to live accordingly to the Word of God. It states that any one of us who chooses to live away from God is not capable of living a life without sin. If we live away from God then we become vulnerable to the various evils that can influence us in our everyday lives. Perhaps, not necessarily to the extent that we commit sins such as murder, but sins which degrade our human dignity in the moral sense. Our human dignity is often challenged and quite often we lack the moral understanding to defend what is good for us. We can easily abuse ourselves by doing things that don’t really reflect the dignity of the person that God has designed us to be. We can be so angry that we hate another person. We can be lustfully aroused and thus become unfaithful. Jesus has preached in the Gospel of Matthew that “if your virtue goes no deeper than that of the scribes and Pharisees, you will never get into the kingdom of heaven” (Matt. 5:17-37). Jesus was very direct and straight to the point when He gave His teaching about the observances of God’s laws. It is never enough to keep His law for the sake of discipline. Also, it is not good for us to ignore His laws. But above all, it will always be difficult for us to know what is right and wrong if we don’t have a proper understanding of our human dignity and if we don’t strengthen our moral understanding by becoming familiar with the Word of God. The Word of God gives us wisdom. It also invites the Spirit of God to dwell in us so that we may receive understanding and grace for ourselves. By this we learn about our human dignity before God and His teachings for our moral goodness. God bless you all. Fr. Jeremy Santoso, OSPPE Associate Pastor

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Christmas 2016

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CHRISTMAS CELEBRATIONS 2016

All  events and holy mass  will be held at the St. Mary’s Worship Center, Upper Coomera

Saturday, 24th December (CHRISTMAS EVE)

4.30pm –  Carol Singing   | 5:00  – Holy Mass 

9.30pm –  Carol Singing  | 10:00 pm –  Holy Mass 

Sunday 25th December 2016 (CHRISTMAS DAY)

7.30am Holy Mass

9.30am Holy Mass

Saturday, 31st December (NEW YEAR’S EVE)

6pm – Holy Mass 

Sunday 1st January 2017 (NEW YEAR’S DAY)

7.30am Mass  |  9am Mass | 5pm Mass 

 

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Lenten Progam

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HOLY WEEK SCHEDULE 

SAINT MARY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH

COOMERA

Ash Wednesday – Mass at 7pm

Stations of the Cross – Every Friday at 7pm

Mass Times :

                (NO 5 PM EVENING MASS ON EASTER SUDAY)

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Christmas Message from Archbishop Mark Coleridge

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