Ministers of the Word

Ministers of the Word are those who are commonly referred to as readers but they are much more than that.You read a newspaper or a novel, you might read to your children. But with Ministers of the Word it is different. They are proclaiming the Word of God. This is God speaking to all of us….. This is what I believe The following is a copy of a document from The Liturgical Commission Of The Catholic Church

MINISTERS OF THE WORD

The grass withers, the flower fades, but the word of our God will stand forever. (Isaiah 40: 8) Your word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path. (Psalm 119: 105) The Word of God endures, creates, gives life. The importance of scripture in liturgy was perhaps lost to some extent in the Catholic Church until the reforms of the second Vatican Council reminded us of its central place.“The Church has always venerated the Divine Scriptures just as she venerates the Body of the Lord.” (Dei Verbum 21)“Christ is present in his Word since it is he himself who speaks when the holy Scriptures are read in the Church.” (Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy 7)The Introduction to the Lectionary for Mass spells out the link between scripture, faith and worship.“The preaching of the word is necessary for the sacramental ministry. For the sacraments are sacraments of faith and faith has its origin and sustenance in the word. The Church is nourished spiritually at the table of God’s word and at the table of the eucharist.” (LMI 10)

The only contact that many Catholics have with the living word of scripture occurs at Sunday Mass. It is vital that this encounter be a positive experience so that they will develop over time a “warm and living love of scripture”.

Those who are called to be readers at Mass, then, take on an important ministry. In fact they are not ‘readers’ at all. Almost everyone can read, but only some can effectively proclaim the word of God. Those people who serve the liturgical gathering by proclaiming the scriptures are best described as ‘Ministers of the Word’.

What is needed to someone to carry out this role effectively? The basic requirement is faith in the word of God. A reader must be someone with a love of scripture who believes that it is alive and active and gives guidance.

Readers must understand what they are reading in order to clearly convey the meaning of a passage to others. Such understanding is achieved by careful preparation, starting well before the person is scheduled to read. This involves reading the scripture passages through several times, slowly coming to grips with what the words are saying. Readers should also have access to a readers’ workbook or scripture commentary to assist them. Practising reading the passages aloud is another important aspect of the preparation process.

Finally, ministers of the word need to have the skills required for reading aloud in public, including a strong voice which can be projected clearly and the ability to use speech techniques such as pace, pause and pitch to give vitality and variety to their reading.

I am often asked by parishes to recommend resources for training their ministers of the word. It seems that not everyone has discovered the addition that was made to Break Open the Word, the preparation book for readers published by The Liturgical Commission in Brisbane, several years ago. In the back of the book are a number of Readers’ Formation pages covering topics such as the arrangement of the lectionary, reading skills and a model for preparation. This material may be used with groups of readers in a parish setting or by readers individually who wish to improve their understanding and skill.

The Word of God is proclaimed rather than just read, which involves the Minister reading the text in prayer and reflection beforehand, so that the Word is actively heard, rather than passively listened to by the Assembly. Training and resources are provided and a current Blue Card is required. New Ministers are welcome. Please contact the parish office to register your interest in this Ministry.

Office Hours: Mon, Tues, Wed, Thur, Friday - 9:00 am to 1:00 pm
Email: coomera@bne.catholic.net.aumail-icon-128
Phone: 07 55299144 call icon

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Weekly Readings

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Weekly Reflection

Dear Parishioners, friends & visitors,
This weekend we celebrate the Feast of the Santo Nino – The Holy Child.
This celebration began on Saturday with the blessing and procession of images
of the Santo Nino. From the Assisi gym, we processed to the church and
celebrated the Mass of the Feast with the gathered Filipino community.
If there are, other feast and celebrations please let me know so that we
can celebrate them as a parish.
Origin of the Feast
A dominantly Catholic country, The Philippines has at least 76 million baptized
Catholics. With over 500 years of presence, the Catholic Church in the
Philippines directly links to the country’s history. Will it come as a surprise
that the stronghold of Catholicism in the country was brought about by an
adorable curly-haired statue of the child Jesus?
The Santo Niño
It all began when an image of the Holy Child, called the Santo Niño, was given
as a baptismal gift to the local chief’s wife by Spanish explorers led by
Portuguese-born Ferdinand Magellan. When Magellan arrived in Cebu, the
local chief, Rajah Humabon, received him positively.
They were baptized to Catholicism together with his 800 subjects.
Rajah Humabon was baptized, Carlos, after the grandfather of the reigning
monarch, King Philip II (from where the name Philippines comes), and his wife
was baptized as Juana, after King Philip’s grandmother,
Queen Juana of Castille.
When Magellan died and the remaining crew returned to Spain, the natives
returned to their old beliefs and made the image into a pagan idol.
Under Miguel Lopez de Legazpi, the Spaniards successfully colonised
the Philippines in 1565. While raiding the villages, they saw the image again
underneath the fires. Legazpi ordered that a shrine be built for the Santo Niño.
The oldest religious icon in the Philippines
The Santo Niño is as old as the Catholic faith in the country.
Made by Flemish artisans, the statue, now known as the Santo Niño de Cebu, is
enshrined in a chapel within Basilica Minore del Santo Niño de Cebu, or simply
Santo Niño Basilica. The statue may be a diminutive figure, but it stands regal
with its left hand holding a cross-bearing orb (a symbol of Christian authority),
while it’s other hand is in a priestly blessing gesture. It has a red cape
with intricate embroidery and on top of its head is a crown.
Venerating the child Jesus was widespread in Spain during Magellan’s time
with European wood sculptors having the child as their subject in the 1300s.
Thus, it is not surprising that they gave it as a gift during the baptism rites of
Rajah Humabon. (A similar Infant Jesus icon is the Holy Child of Prague.)

The original statue brought by Magellan is still found in Cebu. Devotees can see
it encased in bulletproof glass. Santo Niño is highly revered in Cebu and in other
places in the country and its popularity resulted in other versions of a Holy
Child dressed in ways people can relate to, from a policeman to a wandering
child.
From Cebu, Santo Niño is venerated all over the country with festivals
celebrated every third Sunday of January. Cebu holds the annual Sinulog festival,
the Philippines’ main religious festival in the child god’s honour, attracting
millions of devotees and tourists annually for decades. Other festivals celebrated
during the feast of the Holy Child are Kalibo’s Ati-Atihan and
Iloilo’s Dinagyang.

Rev. Michael Scherschel

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Christmas 2016

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CHRISTMAS CELEBRATIONS 2016

All  events and holy mass  will be held at the St. Mary’s Worship Center, Upper Coomera

Saturday, 24th December (CHRISTMAS EVE)

4.30pm –  Carol Singing   | 5:00  – Holy Mass 

9.30pm –  Carol Singing  | 10:00 pm –  Holy Mass 

Sunday 25th December 2016 (CHRISTMAS DAY)

7.30am Holy Mass

9.30am Holy Mass

Saturday, 31st December (NEW YEAR’S EVE)

6pm – Holy Mass 

Sunday 1st January 2017 (NEW YEAR’S DAY)

7.30am Mass  |  9am Mass | 5pm Mass 

 

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Lenten Progam

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HOLY WEEK SCHEDULE 

SAINT MARY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH

COOMERA

Ash Wednesday – Mass at 7pm

Stations of the Cross – Every Friday at 7pm

Mass Times :

                (NO 5 PM EVENING MASS ON EASTER SUDAY)

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Christmas Message from Archbishop Mark Coleridge

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