Ministers of the Word

Ministers of the Word are those who are commonly referred to as readers but they are much more than that.You read a newspaper or a novel, you might read to your children. But with Ministers of the Word it is different. They are proclaiming the Word of God. This is God speaking to all of us….. This is what I believe The following is a copy of a document from The Liturgical Commission Of The Catholic Church

MINISTERS OF THE WORD

The grass withers, the flower fades, but the word of our God will stand forever. (Isaiah 40: 8) Your word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path. (Psalm 119: 105) The Word of God endures, creates, gives life. The importance of scripture in liturgy was perhaps lost to some extent in the Catholic Church until the reforms of the second Vatican Council reminded us of its central place.“The Church has always venerated the Divine Scriptures just as she venerates the Body of the Lord.” (Dei Verbum 21)“Christ is present in his Word since it is he himself who speaks when the holy Scriptures are read in the Church.” (Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy 7)The Introduction to the Lectionary for Mass spells out the link between scripture, faith and worship.“The preaching of the word is necessary for the sacramental ministry. For the sacraments are sacraments of faith and faith has its origin and sustenance in the word. The Church is nourished spiritually at the table of God’s word and at the table of the eucharist.” (LMI 10)

The only contact that many Catholics have with the living word of scripture occurs at Sunday Mass. It is vital that this encounter be a positive experience so that they will develop over time a “warm and living love of scripture”.

Those who are called to be readers at Mass, then, take on an important ministry. In fact they are not ‘readers’ at all. Almost everyone can read, but only some can effectively proclaim the word of God. Those people who serve the liturgical gathering by proclaiming the scriptures are best described as ‘Ministers of the Word’.

What is needed to someone to carry out this role effectively? The basic requirement is faith in the word of God. A reader must be someone with a love of scripture who believes that it is alive and active and gives guidance.

Readers must understand what they are reading in order to clearly convey the meaning of a passage to others. Such understanding is achieved by careful preparation, starting well before the person is scheduled to read. This involves reading the scripture passages through several times, slowly coming to grips with what the words are saying. Readers should also have access to a readers’ workbook or scripture commentary to assist them. Practising reading the passages aloud is another important aspect of the preparation process.

Finally, ministers of the word need to have the skills required for reading aloud in public, including a strong voice which can be projected clearly and the ability to use speech techniques such as pace, pause and pitch to give vitality and variety to their reading.

I am often asked by parishes to recommend resources for training their ministers of the word. It seems that not everyone has discovered the addition that was made to Break Open the Word, the preparation book for readers published by The Liturgical Commission in Brisbane, several years ago. In the back of the book are a number of Readers’ Formation pages covering topics such as the arrangement of the lectionary, reading skills and a model for preparation. This material may be used with groups of readers in a parish setting or by readers individually who wish to improve their understanding and skill.

The Word of God is proclaimed rather than just read, which involves the Minister reading the text in prayer and reflection beforehand, so that the Word is actively heard, rather than passively listened to by the Assembly. Training and resources are provided and a current Blue Card is required. New Ministers are welcome. Please contact the parish office to register your interest in this Ministry.

Office Hours: Mon, Tues, Wed, Thur, Friday - 9:00 am to 1:00 pm
Email: coomera@bne.catholic.net.aumail-icon-128
Phone: 07 55299144 call icon

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Weekly Readings

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From Father John
Dear parishioners, visitors & friends,
 
In 1996, at the funeral of seven Trappist Monks who were brutally murdered in Algeria by some Islamic fanatics, the local Bishop Pierre Claverie of Oran, who was also murdered by the same people a few months later, said in his homily amongst other things, ‘if Christianity distances itself from the cross of Jesus Christ, its content and strength are lost to a certain extent. The vitality of the Church, her fruitfulness and hope, have their matrix and their roots in the cross of Christ. Nowhere else. All the rest is secondary, leads to illusions and pulls the wool over the eyes. The Church cheats herself and others if she acts like a worldly power, like a humanitarian organisation among other humanitarian organisations or like an enterprise of evangelisation with spectacular effects.’ The harsh reality of the crucifixion can often appear to impede on the deep mystery of the cross and even make the cross almost irreconcilable with everything Christianity stands for. But the truth of the matter is that Christianity rises or falls depending on how Christianity makes sense of the mystery of the cross. ‘If Christ, (who died on the cross), had not been raised, then our preaching is in vain and our faith is in vain,’ (1 Corinthians 15:14). The cross is not an emergency measure adopted by God when everything else had failed. The cross was part of God’s eternal plan for the salvation of sinful humanity. Jesus Christ embraced His death on the cross freely and with a generous spirit. “There is no greater love than to lay down one’s life for one’s friends, Christ says” (John 15:13). What was obvious as Jesus Christ took Peter, James and John with him to the Mount of Transfiguration, was that Jesus wanted to seek the approval of God before taking the decisive step to die on cross of Calvary. In the Nicene Creed we profess that Jesus is truly divine, begotten of the Father, consubstantial with the Father, “God from God, Light from Light, true God from true God.” “The Father and I are one, Jesus says” (John 10:30). They might be one but Christ never did anything without the approval of the God, Christ called ‘Abba, Father. “Obedience is an act of faith; disobedience is the result of unbelief,” Edwin Louis Cole once said. In the first reading, we heard of Abram. He was 72 years when God asked him to leave his present place and settle in a new country. Abram obeyed God, and God credited it to him as righteousness, (Genesis 15:6). Today, there are Catholics who are involved in anti-Catholic teachings. They want to be part of the Church but they hate the moral principles of the Church. Christ showed an utter obedience to God. The presence of Elijah and Moses clarified things for Christ. Moses received the Law from God on Mount Sinai and Elijah could be regarded as the greatest of the prophets. They were on the Mountain to give Christ the Ok. As Christians, an authentic and genuine life of freedom and liberation requires of us a profound transformation, and total metanoia. Christ constantly sought the face of God in prayer. Christ was in prayer, in union with the Father, and as He prayed, ‘the aspect of His face was changed and His clothing became brilliant as lightning.’ It is good that we have started the season of Lent. But we need to ensure that this year’s season of lent is special to us individually and communally. We need to be deliberate and intentional in our Lenten observances. Our prayers, fasting and alms-giving need to draw us into the mystery of our being, and into the depth of where we are physically and spiritually united with our God. Just as Peter, James and John descended from the mountain to resume normal living, I hope and pray that our Lenten journey may not leave us isolated but enable us to engage and make a difference in the life of people we meet beyond the walls of our Parish Chapel or the Worship Centre.
 
God bless you all.
Fr. John Ikechukwu Echewodo
Parish Priest
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Christmas 2016

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CHRISTMAS CELEBRATIONS 2016

All  events and holy mass  will be held at the St. Mary’s Worship Center, Upper Coomera

Saturday, 24th December (CHRISTMAS EVE)

4.30pm –  Carol Singing   | 5:00  – Holy Mass 

9.30pm –  Carol Singing  | 10:00 pm –  Holy Mass 

Sunday 25th December 2016 (CHRISTMAS DAY)

7.30am Holy Mass

9.30am Holy Mass

Saturday, 31st December (NEW YEAR’S EVE)

6pm – Holy Mass 

Sunday 1st January 2017 (NEW YEAR’S DAY)

7.30am Mass  |  9am Mass | 5pm Mass 

 

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Lenten Progam

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HOLY WEEK SCHEDULE 

SAINT MARY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH

COOMERA

Ash Wednesday – Mass at 7pm

Stations of the Cross – Every Friday at 7pm

Mass Times :

                (NO 5 PM EVENING MASS ON EASTER SUDAY)

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Christmas Message from Archbishop Mark Coleridge

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