smc-logo-and-name-1Parish Council ( 2017 - 2020 )


Father John Echewodo
Parish Priest

Father John is Nigerian by birth and a Brisbane priest by virtue of priestly ordination. He is the 6th child of late Cletus Echewodo Ajah and late Felicia Uloji Ajah. He is one of eight children, with five brothers, an older sister and a twin sister.

Father John is one of the four Nigerian students, that came to the Archdiocese of Brisbane in 2007. At the completion of his studies and formation through Banyo Seminary, he was ordained to the presbyterate on the 8th December, 2010, on the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Mother of God and our Mother.

Father John has a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy from Imo State Owerri, Nigeria and another degree also in Philosophy from Seat of Wisdom Major Seminary, Owerri, Imo State, which is an affiliate Institute of the Pontifical Urban University Rome. He also has a Bachelor of Arts in Theology from the Brisbane College of Theology and a Masters of Art in Theology from the Australian Catholic University.

Father John can be contacted on :Phone: 075529 9144 or Email: coomera@bne.catholic.net.au

Carmel Naidoo
Parish Council Chairperson

As the chairperson of the Parish Council and as a representative of the whole parish, I oversee with Fr John, the successful operation of the various ministries of our parish. I will endeavour to lead the ongoing growth and harmony of these ministries and our faith community through an approach that is collaborative and supportive.

Email: pcouncil@stmaryscoomera.net.au 

Anand Pinto
Parish Council Vice- Chairperson

As the vice- chairperson of the Parish Council , I work collaboratively with Father John, the chairperson and the parish council to support the various Parish Ministries and do  my best to achieve the Promotion and ICT goals identified  by the Council.

 

Michael Pearcy
Social Activities Co-ordinator

Coordinating social activities, welcoming new parishioners, and social justice programs such as Cherish Life and St Vincent de Paul

 Email: socialjustice@stmaryscoomera.net.au 

Cassandra Balinas
Youth Ministry Coordinator, Coomera Venire Youth Leader

Head of Coomera Venire Youth group; organises monthly Youth masses; leads Youth Band/Choir and organises Youth-led Liturgical events.

Email: venire@stmaryscoomera.net.au  

 

Esther
Parish Council Secretary 

 

 

 

Luke Hennessey

Faith Formation ,

Alpha Program Leader

Email: alpha@stmaryscoomera.net.au 

Heru Santos
Cultural

Email: cultural@stmaryscoomera.net.au 

Lydia Rodrigues
Liturgy Ministry

Email: liturgy@stmaryscoomera.net.au

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Weekly Readings

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Weekly Reflection

Dear Parishioners, friends & visitors,
This weekend we celebrate the Feast of the Santo Nino – The Holy Child.
This celebration began on Saturday with the blessing and procession of images
of the Santo Nino. From the Assisi gym, we processed to the church and
celebrated the Mass of the Feast with the gathered Filipino community.
If there are, other feast and celebrations please let me know so that we
can celebrate them as a parish.
Origin of the Feast
A dominantly Catholic country, The Philippines has at least 76 million baptized
Catholics. With over 500 years of presence, the Catholic Church in the
Philippines directly links to the country’s history. Will it come as a surprise
that the stronghold of Catholicism in the country was brought about by an
adorable curly-haired statue of the child Jesus?
The Santo Niño
It all began when an image of the Holy Child, called the Santo Niño, was given
as a baptismal gift to the local chief’s wife by Spanish explorers led by
Portuguese-born Ferdinand Magellan. When Magellan arrived in Cebu, the
local chief, Rajah Humabon, received him positively.
They were baptized to Catholicism together with his 800 subjects.
Rajah Humabon was baptized, Carlos, after the grandfather of the reigning
monarch, King Philip II (from where the name Philippines comes), and his wife
was baptized as Juana, after King Philip’s grandmother,
Queen Juana of Castille.
When Magellan died and the remaining crew returned to Spain, the natives
returned to their old beliefs and made the image into a pagan idol.
Under Miguel Lopez de Legazpi, the Spaniards successfully colonised
the Philippines in 1565. While raiding the villages, they saw the image again
underneath the fires. Legazpi ordered that a shrine be built for the Santo Niño.
The oldest religious icon in the Philippines
The Santo Niño is as old as the Catholic faith in the country.
Made by Flemish artisans, the statue, now known as the Santo Niño de Cebu, is
enshrined in a chapel within Basilica Minore del Santo Niño de Cebu, or simply
Santo Niño Basilica. The statue may be a diminutive figure, but it stands regal
with its left hand holding a cross-bearing orb (a symbol of Christian authority),
while it’s other hand is in a priestly blessing gesture. It has a red cape
with intricate embroidery and on top of its head is a crown.
Venerating the child Jesus was widespread in Spain during Magellan’s time
with European wood sculptors having the child as their subject in the 1300s.
Thus, it is not surprising that they gave it as a gift during the baptism rites of
Rajah Humabon. (A similar Infant Jesus icon is the Holy Child of Prague.)

The original statue brought by Magellan is still found in Cebu. Devotees can see
it encased in bulletproof glass. Santo Niño is highly revered in Cebu and in other
places in the country and its popularity resulted in other versions of a Holy
Child dressed in ways people can relate to, from a policeman to a wandering
child.
From Cebu, Santo Niño is venerated all over the country with festivals
celebrated every third Sunday of January. Cebu holds the annual Sinulog festival,
the Philippines’ main religious festival in the child god’s honour, attracting
millions of devotees and tourists annually for decades. Other festivals celebrated
during the feast of the Holy Child are Kalibo’s Ati-Atihan and
Iloilo’s Dinagyang.

Rev. Michael Scherschel

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Christmas 2016

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CHRISTMAS CELEBRATIONS 2016

All  events and holy mass  will be held at the St. Mary’s Worship Center, Upper Coomera

Saturday, 24th December (CHRISTMAS EVE)

4.30pm –  Carol Singing   | 5:00  – Holy Mass 

9.30pm –  Carol Singing  | 10:00 pm –  Holy Mass 

Sunday 25th December 2016 (CHRISTMAS DAY)

7.30am Holy Mass

9.30am Holy Mass

Saturday, 31st December (NEW YEAR’S EVE)

6pm – Holy Mass 

Sunday 1st January 2017 (NEW YEAR’S DAY)

7.30am Mass  |  9am Mass | 5pm Mass 

 

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Lenten Progam

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HOLY WEEK SCHEDULE 

SAINT MARY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH

COOMERA

Ash Wednesday – Mass at 7pm

Stations of the Cross – Every Friday at 7pm

Mass Times :

                (NO 5 PM EVENING MASS ON EASTER SUDAY)

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Christmas Message from Archbishop Mark Coleridge

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