Ministers of the Word

Ministers of the Word are those who are commonly referred to as readers but they are much more than that.You read a newspaper or a novel, you might read to your children. But with Ministers of the Word it is different. They are proclaiming the Word of God. This is God speaking to all of us….. This is what I believe The following is a copy of a document from The Liturgical Commission Of The Catholic Church

MINISTERS OF THE WORD

The grass withers, the flower fades, but the word of our God will stand forever. (Isaiah 40: 8) Your word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path. (Psalm 119: 105) The Word of God endures, creates, gives life. The importance of scripture in liturgy was perhaps lost to some extent in the Catholic Church until the reforms of the second Vatican Council reminded us of its central place.“The Church has always venerated the Divine Scriptures just as she venerates the Body of the Lord.” (Dei Verbum 21)“Christ is present in his Word since it is he himself who speaks when the holy Scriptures are read in the Church.” (Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy 7)The Introduction to the Lectionary for Mass spells out the link between scripture, faith and worship.“The preaching of the word is necessary for the sacramental ministry. For the sacraments are sacraments of faith and faith has its origin and sustenance in the word. The Church is nourished spiritually at the table of God’s word and at the table of the eucharist.” (LMI 10)

The only contact that many Catholics have with the living word of scripture occurs at Sunday Mass. It is vital that this encounter be a positive experience so that they will develop over time a “warm and living love of scripture”.

Those who are called to be readers at Mass, then, take on an important ministry. In fact they are not ‘readers’ at all. Almost everyone can read, but only some can effectively proclaim the word of God. Those people who serve the liturgical gathering by proclaiming the scriptures are best described as ‘Ministers of the Word’.

What is needed to someone to carry out this role effectively? The basic requirement is faith in the word of God. A reader must be someone with a love of scripture who believes that it is alive and active and gives guidance.

Readers must understand what they are reading in order to clearly convey the meaning of a passage to others. Such understanding is achieved by careful preparation, starting well before the person is scheduled to read. This involves reading the scripture passages through several times, slowly coming to grips with what the words are saying. Readers should also have access to a readers’ workbook or scripture commentary to assist them. Practising reading the passages aloud is another important aspect of the preparation process.

Finally, ministers of the word need to have the skills required for reading aloud in public, including a strong voice which can be projected clearly and the ability to use speech techniques such as pace, pause and pitch to give vitality and variety to their reading.

I am often asked by parishes to recommend resources for training their ministers of the word. It seems that not everyone has discovered the addition that was made to Break Open the Word, the preparation book for readers published by The Liturgical Commission in Brisbane, several years ago. In the back of the book are a number of Readers’ Formation pages covering topics such as the arrangement of the lectionary, reading skills and a model for preparation. This material may be used with groups of readers in a parish setting or by readers individually who wish to improve their understanding and skill.

The Word of God is proclaimed rather than just read, which involves the Minister reading the text in prayer and reflection beforehand, so that the Word is actively heard, rather than passively listened to by the Assembly. Training and resources are provided and a current Blue Card is required. New Ministers are welcome. Please contact the parish office to register your interest in this Ministry.

Office Hours: Mon, Tues, Wed, Thur, Friday - 9:00 am to 1:00 pm
Email: coomera@bne.catholic.net.aumail-icon-128
Phone: 07 55299144 call icon

Weekly Readings

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From Father John

April 22-23, 2017

Dear parishioners, friends & visitors,

What an amazing time it must have been for the disciples after the Resurrection. In fact it was an amazing time for all of Jesus’ followers. Our Lord’s death seemed so final in those first days and many thought that death had the last word. And yet reports were coming through that Jesus lived. Mary Magdalen and the other Mary had seen the empty tomb and been told by an angel that Jesus had risen and two of His followers had walked with Him on the road to Emmaus. And yet there were always going to be people who would say that the followers of Jesus who believed that He had risen were dreaming or living in hope. In our Gospel reading this week we are told that Thomas would have to carry out the ultimate test before he would believe and because he did it’s not possible that the Resurrection of Jesus Christ was dreamed or imagined. We don’t know much about Thomas. He is hardly referred to in the Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke, and there are only 3 other times in John’s Gospel [apart from this doubting episode] that he is mentioned. But from the little that is written we can still understand something of what this man was like. He was definitely not a coward. When Jesus said that he was to go into Judea after the Jews had threatened to stone Him to death, it was Thomas who spurred on the others saying: “Let us also go, that we may die with Him”. We also know that he was a practical thinker who had trouble understanding some of the deeper things that Jesus said. When Jesus knew that His earthly life would soon end, He told His disciples that He was going to prepare a place for them and that they knew the way to go there. Thomas was the one who asked, “Lord, we do not know where You are going; how can we know the way?” And Jesus gave the answer that pointed to who He was. It spoke of His divinity. He said: “I am the way, the truth, and the life” but this had a profoundness that Thomas would need time and explanation to grasp. So we know that he was fearless and prepared to speak his mind but also that he had difficulty in coming to terms with the deeper aspects of faith. The first time that Jesus appeared amongst His disciples Thomas wasn’t there but the disciples told him about it later. And even though he knew them well and would have trusted them, it was too much for him to accept that Jesus had defeated death. For this practical and courageous man to believe in the risen Christ he must first put his hands in the wounds. Was Jesus upset by this lack of faith? After all, He had taught Thomas for 3 years. Thomas had seen the miracles with his own eyes and there is a good case for saying that he should have known better than to say this. But Jesus wasn’t angry; instead He was patient! On the second occasion when Jesus appeared in the locked room among the disciplesThomas was there and our Lord’s first words were to him. If the onlyway that this man will be convinced is by such a terrible proof, then Jesus wasgoing to give it to him. Why would our Lord agree to this? The reason goes back to the parable of the Good Shepherd who looks for the sheep which is lost or falls behind. If Thomas is the disciple having the most difficulty in believing, then Thomas will be given more care and patience. He is one week behind everybody else and yet Jesus still looked for him and when Thomas finally realised the truth he was the first to proclaim that Jesus Christ is Lord and God. At the end of this passage from John’s Gospel our Lord said something to encourage and inspire us all. He said: “You believe in me, Thomas, because you have seen me; happy those who have not seen, but still believe!” What a wonderful blessing there is in these words for us all who have not seen and yet still believe for they speak to us of the comfort and the strength and the joyfulness that comes from having true faith.

God bless you all.

Fr. John Ikechukwu Echewodo

Parish Priest

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Christmas 2016

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CHRISTMAS CELEBRATIONS 2016

All  events and holy mass  will be held at the St. Mary’s Worship Center, Upper Coomera

Saturday, 24th December (CHRISTMAS EVE)

4.30pm –  Carol Singing   | 5:00  – Holy Mass 

9.30pm –  Carol Singing  | 10:00 pm –  Holy Mass 

Sunday 25th December 2016 (CHRISTMAS DAY)

7.30am Holy Mass

9.30am Holy Mass

Saturday, 31st December (NEW YEAR’S EVE)

6pm – Holy Mass 

Sunday 1st January 2017 (NEW YEAR’S DAY)

7.30am Mass  |  9am Mass | 5pm Mass 

 

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Lenten Progam

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HOLY WEEK SCHEDULE 

SAINT MARY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH

COOMERA

Ash Wednesday – Mass at 7pm

Stations of the Cross – Every Friday at 7pm

Mass Times :

                (NO 5 PM EVENING MASS ON EASTER SUDAY)

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